Weedy-water Caddis

Other Common Names: Little western weedy water caddis, small black caddis
Scientific Names: genus Amiocentrus

A smallish bug, the weedy-water caddis larva builds a round-shaped case from plant material. Hatches are April through June when most anglers are thinking about stoneflies. Trout, however, love these guys and willingly switch to them when a hatch or egg-laying activity starts.

Larvae live in weedy areas with slow-moderate current. Cased larvae frequently drift in the current and are taken by trout. A cased caddis imitation dead-drifted near the bottom in the weedy areas or just downstream from them can yield results.

Pupation occurs in the same water that the larvae lived in. During a hatch, dead-drift a pupa pattern near the bottom in riffly water or just below riffles. An unweighted pupa pattern can also be drifted near the surface, or you can present a Soft Hackle with wet-fly swing. Another good strategy is a dry fly with a pupa pattern as a dropper or trailer; the dry fly acts as an indicator and sometimes is taken by the trout.

After the hatch, errant and unlucky adults fall onto the water, and a dry fly is the right choice. Bankwater downwind or downstream from overhanging trees is a good place to cast your dry.

Females can swim or crawl underwater to lay eggs. Sometimes they sprawl on the surface and release their eggs.. You can fish a dry at this time, or go subsurface with a Soft Hackle or Diving Caddis pattern. Or do both by fishing a dry fly with a wet fly as a dropper or trailer.


Characteristics

LARVA COLOR: Green body, brown case

PUPA SIZE: 5-9 mm

PUPA COLOR: Body--green body. Shroud--tan or dark brown

ADULT SIZE: 5-9 mm

ADULT COLOR: Wing--dark brown or black. Body--Dark green

OTHER CHARACTERISTICS: Larval case is round and tapers to the rear; it is made from plant material. Case, body, wing, and shroud colors can vary, so it's always best to check a natural insect where you are fishing. Body and wing colors will darken when the insect is ready to lay eggs.

 

Click on the fly name to see the pattern. Click on the presentation to learn how to do it.

STAGE PATTERN SIZE/
COLOR
PRESENTATION WHERE
Larva Cased Caddis 10-16
Body: cream, green; Case: brown
indicator, tight line Riffles, moderate-fast runs; just below these
Brachycentrus Larva 10-16
Body: cream, green; Case: brown
indicator, tight line Riffles, moderate-fast runs; just below these
Pupa Deep Sparkle Pupa 12-16
Body: green; Shroud: tan
indicator, tight line Riffles, moderate-fast runs; just below these
Sparkle Pupa 12-16
Body: green; Shroud: tan
indicator, tight line, shallow nymph Riffles, moderate-fast runs; just below these
Z Wing Caddis 12-16
Green
indicator, tight line, shallow nymph Riffles, moderate-fast runs; just below these
Soft Hackle 12-16
Green
surface swing, shallow nymph Riffles, moderate-fast runs; just below these
Adult Elk Hair Caddis 12-16
Body: green, dark brown; Wing: brown, black
standard dry fly Bankwater near foilage
X Caddis 12-16
Body: green, dark brown; Wing: brown, black
standard dry fly Bankwater near foilage
Goddard Caddis 12-16
Natural gray
standard dry fly, skating Riffles
Egg-layer Soft Hackle 12-16
Body: brown; Wing: black
surface swing, shallow nymph, rising nymph Riffles, current seams, backeddies below riffles
Diving Caddis 12-16
Body: brown; Wing: black
surface swing, shallow nymph, rising nymph Riffles, current seams, backeddies below riffles